Personal Independence Payment not meeting support needs of people living with HIV

Personal Independence Payment not meeting support needs of people living with HIV

Publication date

Friday, July 21, 2017

People living with HIV are not getting the support they need from Personal Independence Payment (PIP), according to new research from the National AIDS Trust (NAT).[1]

PIP replaces Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and is supposed to promote independence and participation by helping pay for the extra costs of living with a disability.[2]  

NAT's launches new report 'Working with HIV'

NAT's launches new report 'Working with HIV'

Publication date

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Lessons for employers after first major survey of people living with HIV at work

The findings of the first major piece of research to be conducted into the working experiences of people living with HIV have been revealed by NAT (National AIDS Trust). The research shows that the health effects of HIV are having little impact on people’s ability to work thanks to improvements in treatment, however stigma surrounding HIV still creates barriers in the workplace. 

Failure to Diagnose Early Stage Symptoms is Fuelling Spread of HIV

Failure to Diagnose Early Stage Symptoms is Fuelling Spread of HIV

Publication date

Wednesday, July 23, 2008
The National AIDS Trust has today released the report "Primary HIV Infection". The report finds conclusive evidence that symptoms of early-stage HIV infection (clinically known as "primary HIV infection") are being commonly missed by people who are infected, by doctors and by other healthcare professionals. Failure to diagnose at this early stage is fuelling HIV in the UK.

NAT launches new report on RITA testing and criminal prosecution.

NAT launches new report on RITA testing and criminal prosecution.

Publication date

Thursday, August 4, 2011
NAT has launched a report looking at the validity and meaning of RITA tests (Recent Infection Testing Algorithm) in the context of criminal prosecutions for HIV transmission. RITA tests estimate the likelihood that a person diagnosed HIV positive has been infected recently (usually within the previous six months).