People living with HIV in the UK

In 2013, an estimated 107,800 people were living with HIV in the UK.

The overall prevalence in the UK in 2013 was estimated at 2.8 per 1000 across all ages, or around 1 in 360 people.

 

How many people have been diagnosed and are receiving HIV specialist care?

In 2013, a total of 81,512 people, including 642 children, received HIV specialist care.

Over the last decade, the number of people accessing specialist care for HIV has steadily grown. In 2013, 81,512 people in the UK were accessing HIV treatment and care, this double the number in 2004 (41,157) and a 5% increase from 2012.

 

Is there a difference for men and women?

About two thirds of people receiving HIV specialist care were male.

Gender

% of total receiving HIV specialist care in the UK

Men

67%

Women

33%

 

100%

In 2013, 55,200 men and 26,312 women accessed care.

 

How have people living in the UK acquired their HIV?

Over 95% of people living with HIV in the UK will have acquired HIV through sex without a condom. People living with HIV who were exposed through heterosexual sex are the largest group, though those exposed through sex between men is a close second. 

Probable exposure category

% of total receiving HIV specialist care in the UK

 

 

Heterosexual contact

48%

Sex between men

44%

Injecting drug use

2%

Mother-to-child transmission

2%

Blood/blood products recipient

1%

Other/Unknown

3%

 

100%

Of those receiving HIV care in 2013, 39,169 were exposed through sex between a man and a woman, 36,231 were exposed through sex between men, 1,686 were exposed from injecting drug use, 1,601 were exposed from mother-to-child transmission and 656 were exposed from blood/receiving blood products.  This latter category would only include people exposed outside of the UK, as this is no longer a route of transmission within the UK.

 

What about people of different ethnicities?

Over half of people receiving HIV specialist care in the UK were white, and over a third were black African.

Ethnicity

% of total receiving HIV specialist care in the UK

White

53%

Black African

33%

Other/mixed

5%

Black Caribbean

3%

Black other/ Black-unspecified

2%

Indian/ Pakistani/ Bangladeshi

2%

Other Asian/ Oriental

2%

Not Known

1%

 

100%

 

Are there age differences?

More than half of people accessing HIV care in the UK are aged between 35 and 49.

A combination of ongoing transmission and increased survival has led to a large increase in the numbers of people over 50 who are accessing HIV care.  In 2013, 1 in 4 adults accessing care was aged over 50, compared to 1 in 8 in 2003.

Age

% of total receiving HIV specialist care in the UK

Under 15

1%

15-24

3%

25-34

17%

35-49

52%

50 and over

27%

 

 

Total

100%

 

Are there differences in the four nations of the UK?

The vast majority of people receiving HIV care in the UK in 2013 did so in England.

Nation

% of total people receiving HIV specialist care in the UK

England

92%

Scotland

5%

Wales

2%

Northern Ireland

1%

Other/Unknown

1%

UK

100%

Looking at England, 42% of people living with HIV in the UK in 2013 accessed care in London.  This is the same proportion as in 2012.

Region

% of total people receiving HIV specialist care in the UK

London

42%

South of England

15%

Midlands and East of England

18%

North of England

16%

 

 

For more information please see PHE's website