HIV diagnoses

In 2013, 6000 people in the UK were newly diagnosed with HIV.

Significant numbers of people are being diagnosed with HIV each year, although these figures are levelling off.  There has been a decrease in diagnoses amongst heterosexual men and women, largely due trends in migration from high prevalence countries.  Trends in diagnoses among men who have sex with men remain constant.

 

Are there differences for men and women?

In 2013, 4,477 men and 1,522 women were newly diagnosed with HIV.  75% of people newly diagnosed with HIV in 2013 were men.  The majority (66%) acquired HIV through sex with men, followed by heterosexual sex. Around a quarter of newly diagnosed people in 2013 were women, almost all of whom acquired HIV through heterosexual sex.

Gender 

 % of total newly diagnosed with HIV in the UK during 2012

Male 

 75%

Female 

 25%

How are people in the UK acquiring HIV?

 

The largest proportion of new diagnoses in 2013 were due to sex between men, followed by heterosexual sex.

Probable exposure category

% of total newly diagnosed with HIV in the UK during 2011

Sex between men

49%

Heterosexual men

36%

Injecting drug use

2%

Mother to infant 1%

Blood/tissue products (outside UK)

0.3%

Not reported 11%

 

100%

 

What about people of different ethnicities?

 The percentage of new HIV diagnoses by ethnicity is given below.

Ethnicity

% of those newly diagnosed with HIV in the UK during 2011

White

54%

Black African

21%

Asian 5%

Black Caribbean

3%

Black Other 2%

Other/Mixed

6%

Unknown

10%

 

100%

 

Are there differences between age groups?

There are a growing number of people being diagnosed with HIV later in life. In 2013, around 1 in 6 new diagnosed were in people aged over 50 – more people were diagnosed in this age group than younger (aged between 15-24) people.  In 2013, 70% of people newly diagnosed with HIV were  aged between 25 and 49.

 

What about people in the different parts of the UK?

Each year, the majority of newly diagnosed cases of HIV in the UK occur in England (92% in 2013).  Around half of these diagnoses (49%) were in London.

For more information please see PHE's website